Media Releases    Experts List    Publications    Speakers   
   

Athletics and Recreation Project: Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What is the status of the proposed project?
  2. What is the scope of the proposed project?
  3. How will the proposed project benefit the people who use it?
  4. What are the benefits for athletics and recreation users?
  5. What are the benefits for members of the School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education?
  6. What are the benefits for CanAssist users?
  7. Why do we need this project?
  8. How much will the proposed project cost?
  9. Where will funding for the proposed project come from?
  10. Are students being asked to fund the entire proposed project?
  11. How much are students being asked to contribute?
  12. How will the students’ payment be collected?
  13. Do students have any say about whether they wish to contribute to this proposed project?
  14. What if I’m graduating before 2012, why should I vote?
  15. What if the consultative ballot for the proposed project is rejected?

 

1. What is the status of the proposed project?

In May 2009, UVic’s Board of Governors authorized the Vice President Finance and Operations (VPFO) to proceed to the detailed design and development stage of Phase 1. The VPFO has already developed a program of requirements, schematic designs and a fund raising feasibility study for the first phase of the project.

Student support is a critical part of funding for the project. To that end, students are being asked to support a new Athletics and Recreation building fee of $55 per term. Currently, patrons pay a fitness and weight centre fee to access that specific recreational facility. This fee of $36 per term will not be charged if a new building fee is introduced. A consultative ballot on the new building fee will be held from October 19-23, 2009. The new building fee for graduate students would also be $55 per term (fall and winter) and $27.50 for the summer term. Grad students would have the option of opting out for the summer term.

The ballot is part of a larger consultative process. The results are not binding; they will inform how the university proceeds with the project. If this project does move ahead the new building fee would not be implemented until the building opens in the fall of 2012.

2. What is the scope of the proposed project?

The first phase of a new athletics and recreation project would include upgrades to the McKinnon Building and the construction of a new adjacent building. The School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education (EPHE) would stay in the renovated McKinnon Building. The new building would house Athletics and Recreation (ATRS) and CanAssist—UVic’s leading-edge disabilities support program.

These upgrades would include: additional gym capacity; expanded change facilities for athletics and recreation users; extra multi-use recreational space including fitness and dance space; a climbing wall; additional research laboratories; expanded indoor fieldhouse capacity; and additional teaching capacity, office and meeting areas, and graduate student spaces.

An eventual second stage of the proposed project would encompass construction of aquatic space in the new building and more extensive renovations to the McKinnon Building to address the teaching and research requirements of the EPHE.

Centennial Stadium and university athletics fields are not addressed in this project. Other plans have been developed to renew and upgrade them in the near future.

3. How will the proposed project benefit the people who use it?

The proposed project would serve students, faculty, staff and community members who use athletics and recreation facilities, students and faculty in EPHE and students, researchers and community members associated with CanAssist—UVic’s leading-edge disabilities support program.

The proposed integrated fitness and wellness project would provide exciting new sports, recreation, and related research and educational opportunities for students; superior training facilities for student athletes; and new teaching and research space for faculty and students. In addition, it would increase access for users from the external community.

These upgrades would include: additional gym capacity; expanded change facilities including those for athletics and recreation users; extra multi-use recreational space including fitness and dance space; a climbing wall; additional research laboratories; expanded indoor fieldhouse capacity; and additional teaching capacity, office and meeting areas, and graduate student spaces.

4. What are the benefits for athletics and recreation users?

The proposed integrated fitness and wellness project would provide exciting new sports and recreation opportunities for students and superior training facilities for high-performance athletes. In addition it would address capacity and waitlist issues with existing intramural programs and increase access for users from the external community.

These upgrades would include: additional gym capacity; appropriate change facilities including those for athletics and recreation users; extra multi-use recreational space including fitness and dance space; a climbing wall; and expanded indoor fieldhouse capacity.

5. What are the benefits for members of the School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education?

With improved facilities for athletics, recreation, physical education and related research, the EPHE would have the capacity to provide more student spaces, integrate its research labs, strengthen/expand its research program, and better accommodate its faculty and staff.

[return to top]

6. What are the benefits for CanAssist users?

Housing CanAssist in the same facility as those who use athletics and recreation (including varsity athletes) tangibly demonstrates UVic’s commitment to community engagement and inclusion. By operating within a major hub of the university, CanAssist would be able to provide an expanded, inclusive and fully integrated program for its users, while offering faculty and students an opportunity to participate in a highly interdisciplinary program with research and community service opportunities. The new facility would unify the CanAssist labs and also give associated community groups and agencies access to meeting space and a centralized community resource.

7. Why do we need this project?

UVic students are above-average users of their athletics and recreation facilities when compared to students across Canada, and having top-notch facilities is important to them.

A team of UVic administrators and outside consultants undertook a comprehensive facility study and found that UVic athletics, recreation, and related research and educational facilities were no longer able to meet a growing range of needs. UVic students also deserve facilities that are equal to or better than those at other Canadian universities.

As well, current and prospective students list recreation facilities and programs as a major deciding factor when they pick a university. UVic strives to recruit and retain outstanding students (including varsity athletes), faculty and staff. Upgrading the facilities would help the university in these efforts.

8. How much will the proposed project cost?

The total cost of Phase 1 is estimated at $58.7 million.

9. Where will funding for the proposed project come from?

The results of a funding feasibility study—completed earlier this year—will help to determine the likelihood of receiving donations from private donors, and other funding from government, the university, athletics and recreation program revenue, and student fee revenue.

10. Are students being asked to fund the entire proposed project?

Students are being asked to contribute only toward the improved athletics and recreation facilities that they would use. The new building fee would not be implemented until the building opens in the fall of 2012. It is anticipated that the CanAssist portion will be funded through a combination of government and donor support.

[return to top]

11. How much are students being asked to contribute?

Students are being asked to make a contribution of $21.6 million towards the $58.7 million project, which would only go towards the improved athletics and recreation facilities that they would use. The new building would include: additional gym capacity; extra multi-use recreation space including fitness and dance space; a climbing wall; expanded multisport space; expanded change facilities for athletics and recreation users; office and meeting areas.

A consultative ballot on a new Athletics and Recreation building fee of $55 per term will be held Oct. 19-23, 2009 to ask for student support. The ballot is part of a larger consultative process. The results are not binding; they will inform how the university proceeds with the project. If the project proceeds, the new building fee would not be implemented until the building opens in the fall of 2012.

12. How will the students’ payment be collected?

If students give their support for the proposed project through a consultative ballot, a new Athletics and Recreation building fee of $55 per term would be implemented and would provide access to all athletics and recreation facilities in the new building, including the fitness and weight centre, for which there is currently a separate fee.

The new building fee for graduate students would also be $55 per term (fall and winter) and $27.50 for the summer term. The university has proposed that in 2012, the new building fee for the summer term would be reduced by 50 per cent and with the option for students to opt out.

The proposed new building fee, if approved, would mean UVic’s ATRS fees would be comparable to what is charged at other BC universities. The current annual mandatory undergraduate student fees related to athletics and recreation for September to April (two semesters) are UVic $146; SFU $206 (includes additional benefits); and UBC $211.

When it comes to grad students, there is a different process at all three universities. UVic grad students pay a mandatory athletics and recreation fee of $219 for three terms per calendar year. They also pay for access to the Ian Stewart Centre’s Fitness Weight Centre, as do all patrons of this facility. SFU grad students pay an optional $300 per year. This is an opt-in program and they receive no benefits of service if they don’t pay the $300 annual membership. Students also pay for program access—the $300 amount is essentially facility access. UBC grad students pay a mandatory $211 for three terms. They are required to pay an additional $50 per year for access to fitness and cardio facility bringing the total for full facility access to $261. They also pay for specific programs such as intramurals.

13. Do students have any say about whether they wish to contribute to this proposed project?

A consultative ballot on a new Athletics and Recreation building fee of $55 per term will be held from October 19-23, 2009. The ballot is part of a larger consultative process. The results are not binding; they will inform how the university proceeds with the project.

14. What if I’m graduating before 2012, why should I vote?

Your opinion of the project is important to the university in assessing overall student support regardless of whether you will actually utilize the facility as a student.

15. What if the consultative ballot for the proposed project is rejected?

Student support is a critical part of the potential funding for the project. If the students do not support a new fee for the building, then it would need to be reassessed and it may not proceed in its current form.

[return to top]

For more information about the proposed project contact Michelle Peterson at mpeterso@uvic.ca.


 

Back to Navigation